Data Backup and Retrieve Solution

Backups have two distinct purposes. The primary purpose is to recover data after its loss, be it by data deletion or corruption. Data loss is a very common experience of computer users. A 2008 survey found that 66% of respondents had lost files on their home PC. The secondary purpose of backups is to recover data from an earlier time, according to a user-defineddata retention policy, typically configured within a backup application for how long copies of data are required. Though backups popularly represent a simple form of disaster recovery, and should be part of a disaster recovery plan, by themselves, backups should not alone be considered disaster recovery. Not all backup systems or backup applications are able to reconstitute a computer system, or in turn other complex configurations such as a computer cluster, active directory servers, or a database server, by restoring only data from a backup.

Before data is sent to its storage location, it is selected, extracted, and manipulated. Many different techniques have been developed to optimize the backup procedure. These include optimizations for dealing with open files and live data sources as well as compression, encryption, and de-duplication, among others. Many organizations and individuals try to have confidence that the process is working as expected and work to define measurements and validation techniques. It is also important to recognize the limitations and human factors involved in any backup scheme.

Skytech's Solution :
Storage, the base of a backup system: 
  • Data repository models
Any backup strategy starts with a concept of a data repository. The backup data needs to be stored somehow and probably should be organized to a degree. It can be as simple as a sheet of paper with a list of all backup tapes and the dates they were written or a more sophisticated setup with a computerized index, catalog, or relational database. 
Different repository models have different advantages. This is closely related to choosing a  backup rotation scheme.

Unstructured, Full only / System imaging, Incremental  / Differential, Reverse delta, Continuous data protection
 
  • Storage media
Regardless of the repository model that is used, the data has to be stored on some data storage medium somewhere.

Magnetic tape, Hard disk, Optical storage, Floppy disk, Solid state storage, Remote backup service

  • Managing the data repository
Regardless of the data repository model or data storage media used for backups, a balance needs to be struck between accessibility, security and cost. These media management methods are not mutually exclusive and are frequently combined to meet the needs of the situation. Using on-line disks for staging data before it is sent to a near-line 
tape library is a common example.

On-line, Near-line, Off-line, Off-site data protection, Backup site  or disaster recovery center (DR center)